Mosquito Control

Mosquito Control

Our mosquito control service targets one of the most annoying pests we encounter when outside. Mosquitoes show up everywhere—backyard barbecues, pool parties, baseball games—just waiting to ruin your outdoor fun. But that’s not the worst part. They can also carry dangerous diseases.

Mosquitoes can create allergic reactions and even lead to potentially dangerous diseases such as the Zika virus, West Nile virus and malaria. It’s critical to reduce the mosquito population around your home, particularly if you spend lots of time outside.

Squash-A-Bug Services

Squash-A-Bug Mosquito Programs are unlike most other mosquito control programs because we target mosquitoes where they live and breed. We start with a free inspection of your property, and then we treat high-risk areas such as dense vegetation, under patio decks and other damp areas with poor air circulation. We pay particular attention to stagnant water areas which often attract hordes of mosquitoes to breed and lay their eggs.

Family Playing in Backyard After Using Mosquito Control Service
Squash-A-Bug Mosquito Control Services
i. We offer two Squash-A-Bug Control Programs:
  • Annual or seasonal program: For families who spend a lot of time outside, this program includes monthly inspections and a mosquito treatment plan to reduce mosquito populations around your home and property.
  • One-time treatment: This treatment is perfect for one-time events, such as backyard parties, weddings and other outdoor events.
i. When Is Mosquito Season?

Mosquito season usually occurs between April and tapers off in September. It’s more important than ever to take steps to avoid mosquitoes when you’re outside and to keep their populations down around your home. Our experts offer these tips to lessen the bites and keep you protected from mosquito-borne illnesses. Mosquitoes have been around for millions of years and are one of the most irritating pests known to man. Not only are their bites itchy and annoying, they can also transmit diseases such as Zika virus, malaria, dengue fever, encephalitis, West Nile virus and chikungunya.

Mosquitoes/Zika Virus FAQs

Mosquitoes are vectors of numerous diseases and are often described as one of the deadliest animals on earth. Some of the most common and well-known diseases transmitted by mosquitoes include Zika, West Nile virus, malaria, dengue and equine encephalitis (EEE). According to the World Health Organization (WHO), mosquito bites result in the death of more than 1 million people every year — the majority of these deaths are attributed to malaria and not in the United States.

Mosquitoes are found throughout the U.S., although some species are more common in certain regions. One of these, the Asian tiger mosquito, is found primarily in the South, but it has gradually expanded into the northeast over the past few years. Asian tiger mosquitoes are unique in that they feed during the day, unlike many mosquitoes that feed only at dusk and dawn.

Mosquitoes can breed in as little as a ½ inch of standing water. This underscores the importance of homeowners regularly checking their property for containers that could be collecting water and providing a safe harbor for mosquitoes to breed.

Mosquitoes are considered one of summer’s most dangerous pests, but they also thrive in the spring and fall. In fact, mosquitoes will remain active as long as the temperature is above 60 degrees.

There are a number of precautions that people can take to protect their home and family from mosquitoes. The National Pest Management Association (NPMA) recommends the following tips:

  • Eliminate or reduce mosquito-breeding sites around the home. This includes birdbaths, flowerpots, grill covers, baby pools, unopened swimming pools, tires and other objects where water collects.
  • Remove unneeded vegetation or trash from around any source of standing water that cannot be changed, dumped or removed.
  • Screen windows, doors, and other openings with fine mesh, sealing around all screen edges and keeping doors and windows shut to prevent entry.
  • Minimize outside activity between dusk and dawn, when mosquitoes are most active. But, also take proactive measures during the day to protect against daytime biters, like the Asian tiger mosquito the main carrier of Zika.
  • When outdoors, wear long sleeve shirts, long pants, socks and shoes.
  • Use an insect repellent containing DEET, picaridin or oil of lemon-eucalyptus on exposed skin whenever outdoors.

Concerned homeowners should consider contacting a pest control professional who can help reduce exposure to mosquitoes and decrease the risks for mosquito-borne illnesses by inspecting properties for mosquito breeding sites and treating the area to control mosquitoes.

Many pest management professionals use an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) approach to treating pests, including mosquitoes. The basic steps for IPM are to inspect, identify and treat. It is essential that homeowners work with a licensed pest management professional who can help in proper identification and treatment, and can assist the homeowner in locating breeding sites and eliminating where possible conducive conditions.

Unfortunately, we cannot predict future outbreaks of pest-related illnesses. But, what we do know is that mosquitoes have been on this planet for millions of years and they will continue to thrive during the warmer months.

Zika is a disease that is spread to people primarily through the bite of an infected Aedes species mosquito. According to the CDC, Zika was first discovered in 1947, and in 1952 the first human cases of Zika were detected. Since then, outbreaks of Zika have been reported in tropical Africa, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific Islands. More recently, epidemics have spread across the Eastern Pacific and into South and Central America. There have also been reports of Zika cases across the United States.

Zika virus is spread through the bite of an infected Aedes genus of mosquitoes, which is the same type of mosquito that carries dengue fever and chikungunya. Aedes aegypti, which live predominantly in tropical and sub-tropical regions, are the primary carriers of Zika. Aedes albopictus, commonly known as the Asian tiger mosquito, might also transmit the virus and is found much farther north in the summer.

While the probability of infected mosquitoes traveling to the United States is unlikely, there is reason to believe that Zika virus can spread locally. If more imported cases continue to surface, especially as the summer months near, it may result in human-to-mosquito-to-human spread of the virus in areas of the country where mosquito vectors are present. The National Pest Management Association (NPMA), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and other organizations are monitoring the situation closely. Please find more up-to-date information at PestWorld.org and at CDC.gov.

For the complete information regarding Zika symptoms, diagnosis and treatment, see here from the CDC.

According to the WHO, there are reported potential neurological and auto-immune complications associated with Zika virus disease. Recently, local health authorities in Brazil, have reported an increase in Guillain-Barré syndrome which coincided with Zika infections in the general public, as well as an increase in babies born with microcephaly. More investigation is needed to better understand the relationship between these conditions and the Zika.

Following the NPMA provided prevention tips can help protect your home and family from biting mosquito populations, additionally, it is important to follow updates from the CDC and WHO regarding transmission to limit your risk. If you are traveling, check for travel advisories declared by the CDC.

Hiring a professional pest prevention company to help eliminate them around your home. Contact Massey Services to come out for a free inspection and how we can customize a program for you and your needs.